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Security Upgrades

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It's time to fix these deprecations so that we can finally upgrade to Symfony 6. Go to any page on the site and click the deprecations down on the web debug toolbar to see the list. This is a big list... but a lot of these relate to the same thing: security.

The biggest - and perhaps most wonderful - change in Symfony 5.4 and Symfony 6, is the new security system. But don't worry. It's not that much different from the old one... and the upgrade path is surprisingly easy.

UserInterface, getPassword & PasswordAuthenticatedUserInterface

For the first change, open up the User entity. In addition to UserInterface, add a second PasswordAuthenticatedUserInterface. Until recently, UserInterface had a lot of methods on it, including getPassword().

... lines 1 - 8
use Symfony\Component\Security\Core\User\PasswordAuthenticatedUserInterface;
... lines 10 - 14
class User implements UserInterface, PasswordAuthenticatedUserInterface
{
... lines 17 - 211
}

But... this didn't always make sense. For example, some security systems have users that don't have passwords. For example, if your users log in via a single sign-on system, then there are no passwords to handle. Well, the user might enter their password into that system... but as far as our app is concerned, there are no passwords.

To make this cleaner, in Symfony 6, getPassword() was removed from UserInterface. So you still always need to implement UserInterface... but then the getPassword() method and its PasswordAuthenticatedUserInterface are optional.

UserInterface: getUsername() -> getUserIdentifier()

Another change relates to getUsername(). This method lives on UserInterface... but its name was always confusing. It made it seem like you needed to have a username... when really, this method is supposed to return any unique user identifier - not necessarily a username. Because of that, in Symfony 6, this has been renamed from getUsername() to getUserIdentifier(). Copy this, paste, change getUsername to getUserIdentifier()... and that's it.

... lines 1 - 14
class User implements UserInterface, PasswordAuthenticatedUserInterface
{
... lines 17 - 69
/**
* A visual identifier that represents this user.
*
* @see UserInterface
*/
public function getUserIdentifier(): string
{
return (string) $this->email;
}
... lines 79 - 221
}

We do need to keep getUsername() for now because we're still on Symfony 5.4... but once we upgrade to Symfony 6, we can safely remove it.

New Security System: enable_authenticator_manager

But the biggest change in Symfony's security system can be found in config/packages/security.yaml. It's this enable_authenticator_manager. When we upgraded the recipe, it gave us this config... but it was set to true.

security:
... lines 2 - 9
enable_authenticator_manager: false
... lines 11 - 64

This teenie, tiny, innocent-looking line allows us to switch from the old security system to the new one. And what that means, in practice, is that all of the ways you authenticate - like a custom authenticator or form_login or http_basic - will suddenly start using an entirely new system under the hood.

For the most part, if you're using one of the built-in authentication systems, like form_login or http_basic... you probably won't notice any changes. You can activate the new system by setting this to true... and everything will work exactly like before.... even though the code behind form_login will suddenly be very different. In a lot of ways, the new security system is an internal refactoring to make the core code more readable and to give us more flexibility, when we need it.

Guard -> Custom Authenticator Conversion

However, if you have any custom guard authenticators... like we do, you'll need to convert these to the new authenticator system... which is super fun anyways... so let's do it!

Open up our custom authenticator: src/Security/LoginFormAuthenticator.php. We can already see that AbstractFormLoginAuthenticator from the old system is deprecated. Change this to AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator.

... lines 1 - 20
use Symfony\Component\Security\Http\Authenticator\AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator;
... lines 22 - 23
class LoginFormAuthenticator extends AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator
{
... lines 26 - 107
}

I know, it's almost the exact same name: we just swapped "Form" and "Login" around. If your custom authenticator is not for a login form, then change your class to AbstractAuthenticator.

Oh, and we don't need to implement PasswordAuthenticatedInterface anymore: that was something for the old system.

Adding the New Authenticator Methods

The old Guard system and new authenticator system do the same thing: they figure out who's trying to log in, check the password, and decide what to do on success and failure. But the new authenticator style will feel quite a bit different. For example, you can immediately see that PhpStorm is furious because we now need to implement a new method called authenticate().

Ok! I'll go down below supports(), go to "Code Generate" - or "cmd" + "N" on a Mac - and implement that new authenticate() method. This is the core of the new authenticator system... and we're going to talk about it in a few minutes.

... lines 1 - 24
class LoginFormAuthenticator extends AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator
{
... lines 27 - 40
public function authenticate(Request $request)
{
// TODO: Implement authenticate() method.
}
... lines 45 - 113
}

Oh, but the old and new systems do share several methods. Like, they both have a method called supports()... but the new system has a bool return type. As soon as we add that, PhpStorm is happy.

... lines 1 - 25
class LoginFormAuthenticator extends AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator
{
... lines 28 - 35
public function supports(Request $request): bool
{
... lines 38 - 39
}
... lines 41 - 114
}

Below, on onAuthenticationSuccess(), it looks like we need to add a return type here as well. At the end, add the Response type from HttpFoundation. Nice! And while we're working on this method, rename the $providerKey argument to $firewallName.

... lines 1 - 25
class LoginFormAuthenticator extends AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator
{
... lines 28 - 90
public function onAuthenticationSuccess(Request $request, TokenInterface $token, string $firewallName): Response
{
... lines 93 - 97
}
... lines 99 - 114
}

You don't have to do this, that's just the new name of the argument... and it's more clear.

Next, down on onAuthenticationFailure(), add the Response return type there as well. Oh, and for onAuthenticationSuccess(), I just remembered that this can return a nullable Response. In some systems - like API token authentication - you will not return a response.

... lines 1 - 25
class LoginFormAuthenticator extends AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator
{
... lines 28 - 99
public function onAuthenticationFailure(Request $request, AuthenticationException $exception): Response
{
... lines 102 - 108
}
... lines 110 - 114
}

Finally, we still need a getLoginUrl() method, but in the new system, this accepts a Request $request argument and returns a string.

... lines 1 - 25
class LoginFormAuthenticator extends AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator
{
... lines 28 - 110
protected function getLoginUrl(Request $request): string
{
return $this->urlGenerator->generate(self::LOGIN_ROUTE);
}
}

Alright! we still need to fill in the "guts", but we at least have all the methods we need.

Removing supports() for "form login" authenticators

And actually, we can remove one of these! Delete the supports() method.

... lines 1 - 25
class LoginFormAuthenticator extends AbstractLoginFormAuthenticator
{
... lines 28 - 35
public function supports(Request $request): bool
{
return self::LOGIN_ROUTE === $request->attributes->get('_route')
&& $request->isMethod('POST');
}
... lines 41 - 114
}

Ok, this method is still needed by custom authenticators and its job is the same as before. But, if you jump into the base class, in the new system, the supports() method is implemented for you. It checks to make sure that the current request is a POST and that the current URL is the same as the login URL. Basically, it says

I support authenticating this request if this is a POST request to the login form.

We wrote our logic a bit differently before, but that's exactly what we were checking.

Ok, it's time to get to the meat of our custom authenticator: the authenticate() method. Let's do that next.

Leave a comment!

What PHP libraries does this tutorial use?

// composer.json
{
    "require": {
        "php": "^8.0.2",
        "ext-ctype": "*",
        "ext-iconv": "*",
        "babdev/pagerfanta-bundle": "^3.6", // v3.6.1
        "composer/package-versions-deprecated": "^1.11", // 1.11.99.5
        "doctrine/annotations": "^1.13", // 1.13.2
        "doctrine/dbal": "^3.3", // 3.3.5
        "doctrine/doctrine-bundle": "^2.0", // 2.6.2
        "doctrine/doctrine-migrations-bundle": "^3.2", // 3.2.2
        "doctrine/orm": "^2.0", // 2.11.2
        "knplabs/knp-markdown-bundle": "^1.8", // 1.10.0
        "knplabs/knp-time-bundle": "^1.18", // v1.18.0
        "pagerfanta/doctrine-orm-adapter": "^3.6", // v3.6.1
        "pagerfanta/twig": "^3.6", // v3.6.1
        "sensio/framework-extra-bundle": "^6.0", // v6.2.6
        "sentry/sentry-symfony": "^4.0", // 4.2.8
        "stof/doctrine-extensions-bundle": "^1.5", // v1.7.0
        "symfony/asset": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/console": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/dotenv": "6.0.*", // v6.0.5
        "symfony/flex": "^2.1", // v2.1.7
        "symfony/form": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/framework-bundle": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/mailer": "6.0.*", // v6.0.5
        "symfony/monolog-bundle": "^3.0", // v3.7.1
        "symfony/property-access": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/property-info": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/proxy-manager-bridge": "6.0.*", // v6.0.6
        "symfony/routing": "6.0.*", // v6.0.5
        "symfony/runtime": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/security-bundle": "6.0.*", // v6.0.5
        "symfony/serializer": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/stopwatch": "6.0.*", // v6.0.5
        "symfony/twig-bundle": "6.0.*", // v6.0.3
        "symfony/ux-chartjs": "^2.0", // v2.1.0
        "symfony/validator": "6.0.*", // v6.0.7
        "symfony/webpack-encore-bundle": "^1.7", // v1.14.0
        "symfony/yaml": "6.0.*", // v6.0.3
        "symfonycasts/verify-email-bundle": "^1.7", // v1.10.0
        "twig/extra-bundle": "^2.12|^3.0", // v3.3.8
        "twig/string-extra": "^3.3", // v3.3.5
        "twig/twig": "^2.12|^3.0" // v3.3.10
    },
    "require-dev": {
        "doctrine/doctrine-fixtures-bundle": "^3.4", // 3.4.1
        "phpunit/phpunit": "^9.5", // 9.5.20
        "rector/rector": "^0.12.17", // 0.12.20
        "symfony/debug-bundle": "6.0.*", // v6.0.3
        "symfony/maker-bundle": "^1.15", // v1.38.0
        "symfony/var-dumper": "6.0.*", // v6.0.6
        "symfony/web-profiler-bundle": "6.0.*", // v6.0.6
        "zenstruck/foundry": "^1.16" // v1.18.0
    }
}